Canberra Aircraft at RAF Tengah, 1957 to 1970

By Ian Old

45SqnB15s

More Photos

45 Sqn., B.2 and later B.15, 22 November 1957 to 18 February 1970

81 Sqn., PR.7 – 6 January 1960 to 16 January 1970

Background

The Canberra was the result of a 1944 Air Ministry requirement to replace the unarmed, high-speed, multi-role Mosquito, and the specification for the new type was E.3/45. The successful tender was submitted by English Electric, which received an order for four prototypes on 7 January 1946, the specification being amended to B.3/45. The basic requirement was for an aircraft that could attain an altitude of 45,000 feet whilst flying at Mach 0.75 and with a payload of 6,000lb. of bombs and deliver those bombs to a target 700 miles away and then return to base. The design had begun with two crew members but due to delays and difficulties with the H2S Mk.9 radar system, it was decided in 1947 to add a second navigator, who would undertake visual bomb-aiming if necessary. The Specification was changed for the last time, to B.5/47. In July 1949 the blind bombing requirement was withdrawn and a glazed nose was fitted to bomber and photo-reconnaissance examples as a result. A visual bombsight was fitted along with an updated Gee-H Mk.II navigation system. The first flight of the first prototype took place on 13 May 1949, by which 132 production aircraft had been ordered. In 1950 the type was named Canberra, in honour of Australia, which was the first export customer.

Unlike the Mosquito, which was contructed mostly from wood, the Canberra was of metal construction, although the fin had a wooden frame and was covered with plywood. Generally, the type proved to be popular, although pilots learned that it had to be treated with respect.

The photo-reconnaissance development of the Canberra was intended to replace the Mosquito PR.34 then in service with the RAF, and which was the final variant of the famous “Wooden Wonder” to see front-line service, when retired in December 1955, flown by 81 Sqn.

The variants (that served with FEAF)

The B.2 was the first production variant of the Canberra, the first jet-powered bomber produced by the United Kingdom. Total bomb load was 6,000lbs., all carried in the bomb-bay. It was fitted with two Rolls-Royce Avon Mk.101 turbojets, each producing 6,500lb. of thrust. Its crew comprised one pilot and two navigators, one dealing with transiting to and from the target and the other with weapons aiming and release. The radio transmitted and received VHF only. Production of this variant was 418. Production was shared between English Electric, Handley Page, Avro and Shorts to maintain a skilled workforce prior to the production of the imminent trio of V-Bombers.

The T.4 was a dual control trainer variant of the B.2. It is easy to identify as there was no glass in the extreme nose, as it was for pilot training only. Although each T.4 had a bomb-bay, no beam was fitted which would have allowed the carriage of bombs and therefore this variant was unarmed.

The B.6 was the first bomber development of the B.2 and was a tactical derivative. It had improved avionics and increased weapons options. Blue Silk Doppler radar was fitted, it being a self-contained navigational system. A radio altimeter was now standard although its value at low-level in the Far East was debatable as there was some doubt as to whether the system was measuring the distance from the aircraft to the top of the trees in the jungle or the much firmer ground itself. The radio could now work in UHF, VHF and HF modes. The engines were Rolls-Royce Avon 109s, each producing 7,400lb of thrust. Instead of the single cartridge starter unit in the B.2, the B.6 had three cartridges. The fuselage was extended by twelve inches and there were integral fuel tanks installed in the wings. This meant a B.6 could fly direct from Tengah to Hong Kong, instead of having to route via the Philippines as the B.2s had to. Ninety seven examples were built for the RAF.

The B.15 was a B.6 optimised for low-level ground attack, although it could operate in the original conventional or nuclear pure bombing roles. This variant was to serve only with NEAF and FEAF. It featured updated avionics and had three cameras fitted, for post-strike analysis. It was fitted with two underwing pylons, each capable of carrying a 1,000lb. bomb. This meant its maximum bombload had been increased by a third. Alternatively, each pylon could be fitted with a pod containing thirty seven 2 inch unguided rockets. The rockets were usually launched when in a 20o dive and when 1,500 yards from the target. 38 B.6s were converted to B.15 standard. Some B.15s were further modified to carry Nord AS.30 guided missles, although without a change of designation.

The PR.7 was a two seat photo-reconnaissance development of the B.6, the crew comprising one pilot and one navigator. The fuselage was fourteen inches longer than the B.2, the extended fuselage sections being fitted with cameras and flare bays, the latter allowing night missions to be flown, including at low-level when required. The standard camera fits were either one 6 inch and four 20 inch cameras or one 6 inch and six 36 inch cameras. Additional fuel tanks were fitted in the fuselage and wing leading edges, giving a maximum capacity of 3,305 gallons. The wingspan was increased to improve high altitude performance. Its engines were the Avon 109, as per the B.6. Production of this version was 74 examples. It also featured improved brakes, Maxaret anti-skid brakes.

Service with 45 Sqn.

Service with 45 Sqn.

In 1956 FEAF had two ground attack units, 45 and 60 Squadrons, the former based at Butterworth, the latter at Tengah, and both equipped with De Havilland Venom FB.4s. 45 Sqn. was selected to convert to the Canberra B.2, with its first machines joining in November 1957. A cadre had been formed at Coningsby earlier in 1957 to gain experience on the new type before transfer to Tengah. As of 22 November 1957, the unit was a Canberra operator at Tengah, the majority of machines being of the original bomber variant, the B.2. It was now part of the British contribution to the Commonwealth Strategic Reserve. Operation FIREDOG, the Commonwealth response to Communist Terrorists (CTs) in Malaya, was still underway and the first bombing missions carried out by 45 Sqn. Canberras took place on 18 March 1958 (Operation GINGER, four machines involved) and the last one during August 1959.

Forty-eight nuclear weapons, codenamed “RED BEARD”, were stored in very secure conditions at Tengah between 1961-71. It is assumed that these were available for use by the Canberras.

In August 1962 the first B.15, WH959, arrived. It was also the first camouflaged Canberra to join 45 Sqn. The last B.2 departed for the UK in December 1962, it being the last example of that variant to be used as a front-line bomber by the RAF.

President Sukarno of Indonesia wanted to form a greater Indonesia, by having control or strong influence over most or all of Malaya, Singapore, Brunei, Sabah and Sarawak, the last three on the island of Borneo, which was split between British and Indonesian control. This grouping, with the Philippines, would have been known as Maphilindo and would have been politically non-aligned. Meanwhile the growing communist agitation in the region led to a move amongst some of Sukarno’s target countries to form their own federation, which was to be known as Malaysia. This was announced in May 1961 and was intended to comprise Malaya, Singapore, and the British colonies of North Borneo (later renamed Sabah) and Sarawak and the British protectorate of Brunei. This caused Sukarno to begin attempts to destabilise the British controlled or pro-British areas on the island of Borneo.

There was some genuine internal opposition on the island of Borneo to the notion of Malaysia, to some extent due to cultural, economic and political differences between Borneo on the one hand, and Malaya and Singapore on the other. There was some support for a Borneo federation. During 1962 rumours spread that there were armed rebels, keen to display their opposition to Malaysia. UK forces reviewed its contingency plans to reinforce Brunei – Operation PALE ALE. The first rebel action was to start unrest in Brunei in December 1962, which Sukarno did not initiate but was supportive of.

On 7 December, UK forces in Singapore were informed that there was a high probability of armed unrest, which began on the following day and occurred in Brunei. Soldiers were placed on standby to move. The oil refinery at Seria, the airstrip at Anduki, 2 miles from Seria, and the police station at nearby Panaga were all seized by pro-Indonesian rebels, with fifty European being taken as hostages. The British military forces in the region were ordered to react very quickly.

Several high-ranking officers were flown to Labuan in 45 Sqn. Canberras on 8 and 9 December, as these were the fastest aircraft available. On 10 December an armed reconnaissance mission was flown, the 45 Sqn. crew of Thomas and Steven were joined by the OC, Offensive Support Wing, Wing Commander Pedder, in WH969. It made dummy attacks over rebels, persuading them to surrender to British troops. On 12 December 45 Sqn. machines flew patrols looking for Indonesian shipping.

The last of the original B.15 allocation to arrive at Tengah, WH958, its final leg starting at Delhi, India, landing in Singapore on 13 January 1963.

Training with rocket projectiles began in February 1963. In October 1963, 45 Sqn. commenced Low Altitude Bombing System (LABS) training. This was a technique developed to deliver a nuclear weapon at very low-level and produced unplanned stresses on the airframe, leading to modifications which strengthened of the airframe and bomb doors. This meant that there were four distinct operational modes in which the crews had to be proficient, namely (i) conventional low-level, (ii) conventional high-level, (iii) Rocket Projectile (RP) and (iv) LABS. Due to the need to change the configuration of airframes for the varying modes, it was found to be most efficient, in terms of aircrew, groundcrew and airframes, to put all aircraft in the same mode for a period of two weeks, before changing to the next. Around this time the number of B.15s on strength rarely exceeded ten and of these some would be undergoing maintenance at any one time. This meant that it would be rare for more than eight aircraft to be available for flying. Therefore each mode was practised every six weeks. All weapons were delivered visually and this meant there was no night low-level training.

During the Borneo Confrontation, it had detachments at Labuan (Brunei), Kuching (Sarawak) and Kuantan (West Malaysia, north of Singapore). The standard weapons load was 6 x 1,000lb. free-fall bombs in the bomb-bay and two Mighty Mouse rocket pods, with a total of 74 unguided rockets. Together with 20 Sqn. (Hunter FGA.9), 45 Sqn. formed the Offensive Support Wing from 1963 onwards. For most operations, only rockets or cannons were permitted to be fired, in order to mimimise casualties

During 2-8 October 1963, the whole of 45 Sqn. was deployed to Kuantan, Malysia, to demonstrate its ability to operate from a “bare base” location. This event was designated Exercise MERRYDOWN and was deemed to be a success.

From mid 1963, incursions into Sarawak, North Borneo and Brunei were made by pro-separatist guerrillas, operating from Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo).

Between 9 and 12 March, Canberra B.6 WT209 was deached to Labuan to calibrate the nely-installed air defence radar system.

On 16 September 1963 the Federation of Malaysia was formed. This comprised Malaya, Singapore, Sabah (formerly British North Borneo) and Sarawak but not Brunei. President Sukarno decided he had to commit Indonesian regular forces in operations, including making several abortive attempts to land armed personnel on the Malaysian mainland in 1964.

From the middle of 1964, along with the application of camouflage, the appearance of the machines became more tactical and therefore less colourful by reducing the size of the unit’s insignia and replacing the very large white serials and replacing them with much smaller characters in black.

A State of Emergency was declared in September 1964. 45 Sqn. deployed to Kuantan for three weeks, being replaced by Canberra B.(I.)8s from Royal Air Force Germany. The reinforcements from both RAF Germany and the Near East Air Force allowed 45 Sqn. to maintain a detachment at Labuan, from where they undertook border patrols. A weapons range was established at Balembangan Island, off the coast of North Borneo (Sabah).

During September 1964 the two Royal Navy aircraft carriers in theatre, HMS Centaur and HMS Victorious were ordered to sail through the Sunda Straits, which are between the islands of Java and Sumatra. This action challenged the Indonesian’s declaration that these waters were for Indonesian vessels only. Every aircraft at Tengah which not undergoing major servicing was made flyable and then brought to cockpit readiness, in case the Indonesians attacked the carriers. 45 Sqn. would have attacked airfields and fuel installations in mainland Indonesia, with its Canberras operating at extreme range. All conventional weapons would have been used. There was a very tense wait, but in the end, no order to take off was needed.

45 Sqn. had only one mission during the Confrontation when weapons were dropped in anger. Due to political constraints, offensive operations were controlled to the extent that the only weapons that were allowed to be used, when authorised, were cannons, rockets and rocket pods. This meant that only Hunters and Canberra bombers were involved. Politicians were extremely keen to avoid civilian casualties and it was also very difficult for aircraft to locate targets in the jungle. Low-level patrols were flown to maintain morale amongst the ground units and deter Indonesian aggression.

On 23 December 1964 Indonesian troops landed in Johore, West Malaysia. Together with 20 Sqn. Hunters, the Indonesians were engaged as part of Operation BIRDSONG. On the 23rd and 24th, Canberras and Hunters made dummy attacks on the Indonesian invaders, in the hope that they would surrender. This did not happen and one live attack by a Canberra was then made. Its pilot was Wing Commander Brian Carruthers, OC 45 and the ordnance delivered was 2 inch rocket projectiles. A Forward Air Controller, flying in a Whirlwind, assisted in the attack. This had the desired effect and the Indonesians soon began to surrender. This mission was the last time an RAF Canberra would use weapons in anger.

Due to runway resurfacing, six aircraft from 45 Sqn. were detached to Labuan during May.

Exercise SHAVING BRUSH took place in September 1965. It was designed to test the feasibility of Shackleton aircraft dropping flares so that the Canberras could deliver rocket and bomb attacks at night and it proved successful.

During 1965 the detachment deployed in theatre from 45 Sqn. decreased. From June only one machine was based at Labuan (Brunei) and then from October the presence was changed to three aircraft, now at Kuching (Sarawak) but only for a weekend at a time. But on 8 November the last machine detached was flown back to Tengah. From then on until the end of the Confrontation, 45 Sqn. operated on the basis of being ready to deploy eastwards and then react to actual Indonesian aggression.

Constant and dynamic Allied efforts meant Sukarno’s dream was never to be realised. There was a communist-inspired coup in Indonesia on 30 September 1965, with a counter-coup soon following. He was overthrown in March 1966, being replaced by Suharto.

In January 1966, B.6 XK641 was detached to Labuan to carry out border patrols and conduct training with Forward Air Controllers.

In June 1966 the first B.15 capable of delivering the AS.30 guided missiles arrived. This was WH977. A ground simulator was also delivered. Two other similar-modified machines had joined 45 Sqn. During four training sessions, two at Labuan and two at Woomera, Australia, 128 AS.30s were fired. It was normal for the missile to be fired 3.5 miles from the target, the aircraft having flown at low-level, before climbing to 1,000 feet for the launch itself. The missile was guided by wire to the target, this being performed by one of the navigators. This meant the aircraft had to remain close to the target until the missile impacted, which is not desirable when the target is defended or there are enemy air defence systems operating. The AS.30 could be used in the anti-shipping role, a tasking which was considered desirable in light of the Borneo Confrontation. However, full operational capability was not reached until the end of the Confrontation. Only three missile-capable examples had arrived by the end of 1966.

Peace was declared in August 1966 and the Borneo Confrontation was over. British and Commonwealth forces suffered 114 dead and 181 wounded. 439 gallantry awards were given. There were 36 deaths amongst Malaysian civilians, along with 53 wounded and 4 captured. Indonesian casualties comprised 590 dead, 220 injured and 771 captured.

During 1968-69, as a change from routine training profiles, some machines were deployed to Kai Tak, Hong Kong, to participate in training with ground-based Forward Air Controllers.

With the reallocation of the Vulcan force, with two squadrons being moved from Cottesmore to Akrotiri, Cyprus, in 1969, the Canberras operated in Cyprus by 6, 32, 73 and 249 Sqns. were now surplus. Therefore there were machines available to join 45 Sqn., allowing the fleet at Tengah to be improved. The rigours of low-level flying had led to cracks appearing in the wing centre section of several machines and this resulted in three aircraft being grounded during 1969.

45 Sqn. held a joint disbandment with 20 Sqn. at Tengah, on 18 February 1970, with six Canberras and six Hunters in the flypast.

OCs

Wing Commander Brian Carruthers (approximately 1962-64)

Others unknown.

Markings

A white circle on the fin with a blue camel with red wings. Up to 1964, the circle was very large, being larger than the fuselage roundel. The badge circumference was reduced in size significantly from 1964 due to the perception that large unit insignia was a disadvantage during the Confrontation with Indonesia. Some aircraft were coded. The only picture I have seen appears to show that the code letter was applied only to the tip tank.

B.2s on strength of 45 Sqn. and those on strength on 1 January of each year (1958 – 62)

Serial 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962
WD948 YES YES YES
WH646 YES YES YES
WH665 YES YES YES
WH666
WH667 YES YES YES
WH739
WH853 YES
WH874 YES YES YES YES
WH882
WH922 YES YES
WJ567 YES YES YES YES
WJ570 YES YES YES
WJ605
WJ630
WJ632 YES YES YES YES
WJ648 YES
WJ727 YES
WJ981 YES YES YES YES
WJ983
WJ986 YES
WJ988
WK102
WK111 YES
2 8 11 8 9

T.4s on strength of 45 Sqn. and those on strength on 1 January of each year (1958 – 70)

Serial ‘58 ‘59 ‘60 ‘61 ‘62 ‘63 ‘64 ‘65 ‘66 ‘67 ‘68 ‘69 ‘70
WD963 YES
WH651 YES YES YES YES YES
WH706 YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES
WH847 YES YES
1 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 0 1

B.15s. on strength of 45 Sqn. and those on strength on 1 January of each year (1963 – 70)

Serial 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970
WH948 YES
WH955 YES YES YES
WH956 YES YES
WH958 YES YES
WH959 YES YES YES
WH961 YES YES YES
WH963 YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES
WH965 YES YES YES
WH966 YES
WH968 YES
WH969 YES YES YES YES YES
WH974 YES YES YES
WH976 YES YES YES YES
WH977 YES YES YES
WH981 YES
WJ766 YES YES YES YES YES YES YES
WT206
WT208 YES YES YES YES
WT209 YES YES YES YES YES YES
WT211 YES YES YES YES YES
WT213 YES YES YES
WT370
XK641 YES YES YES YES
8 9 9 8 10 11 10 8

PHOTO-RECONNAISSANCE – 81 Sqn.

The first Canberra for 81 Sqn. was a trainer, T.4 WH651, which was issued to the unit on 6 January 1960. The first PR.7, WH777, arrived on 12 February. The last Pembroke serving with 81 Sqn. departed during July 1960 and in July 1961 the last pair of Meteor PR.10s left the unit, meaning that it operated only Canberras for the rest of its existence.

During 1961/62, the squadron was very busy carrying out a photo-survey of Thailand. For 1962/63 the tasking concentrated on a surveying North Borneo, Sarawak and Brunei, all being on the island which was known as Borneo to the British and Kalimantan to the Indonesians.

When the armed revolt took place in Brunei on 8 December 1962, 81 Sqn. sent aircraft to Labuan (Brunei) to monitor the situation. (Refer to 45 Sqn. section for background information.) The first mission, the crew being Brown and Armstrong, flew low in very poor weather over Brunei. Unfortunately an unmarked radio mast came into contact with the aircraft, removing several square feet of wing, leading to an emergency landing at Labuan. It is possible that the machine involved was WH780.

In 1963 the highest priority was given to the photographing of the whole of British-controlled Borneo. During May to September 1963, this task was being pursued seven days a week and 80% of the land had been surveyed before bad weather intervened. At no point during its time operating Canberras did it have more than seven PR.7s on strength. During the Borneo Confrontation it had aircraft detached to Labuan and on at least one occasion the mission entailed overflying Kalimantan.

In February 1965 two PR.7 aircraft were detached to RAAF Darwin for Exercise HOT SQUIRREL. Another task not connected with the Confrontation included Exercise AIR BOON CHOO, which took place over Thailand and featured SEATO members practising responses to various scenarios, in this case, an invasion of the country. 81 Sqn. flew night-time low-level missions during this exercise, during 1964. The name was derived from the name of the head of the Royal Thai Air Force at the time. Photography of north east Malaysia, following on from work carried out as part of Operation FIREDOG (1948-60), was also undertaken.

Once the Confrontation was over, from 1966, Indonesia asked for the photography of Borneo, which had not been completed due to the Confrontation, to be extended to include Indonesian Borneo, which they knew as Kalimantan. This involved missions at 20,000 feet and individual sorties involving 200 mile long sectors. The 81 Sqn. crews were briefed to photograph sites of interest to the British whilst overflying Indonesian territory.

The ability of the PR.7’s cameras to take oblique photographs from high-level was exploited by sending aircraft frequently to Hong Kong so that intelligence could be gathered whilst flying just outside Chinese airspace.

During 1969, some PR.7s were detached to Labuan, by now no longer an RAF base, to complete the photographic survey of Borneo.

In its final month of operations, 81 hours were flown. It was disbanded on 16 January 1970, with a fourship flypast at sunset to mark the event. The four aircraft were PR.7s WH780 (lead), WH791 (crewed by M. Philips and A.J. Harrison) and WH797, with T.4 WH706, loaned from 45 Sqn., bringing up the rear.

OCs

Sqn. Ldr. R.J. Linford (to February 1961)

Sqn. Ldr. S.J. West (to August 1963)

Sqn. Ldr. G.N. Gilbert (during 1966)

Sqn. Ldr. J.B. Fitzpatrick

Markings

A white circle on the fin with a five-pointed star with a sword superimposed. Forward of and below the canopy, a yellow playing card with the Ace of Spades was applied.

No codes were carried.

 

Serial ‘61 ‘62 ‘63 ‘64 ‘65 ‘66 ‘67 ‘68 ‘69 ‘70
WD963 YES
WH651 YES YES YES YES
WH706 YES YES YES YES
WH847
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1

PR.7s on strength of 81 Sqn. and those on strength on 1 January of each year (1961 – 70)

style=”width:744px”

Serial ‘61 ‘62 ‘63 ‘64 ‘65 ‘66 ‘67 ‘68 ‘69 ‘70
WH777 YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES
WH778 YES YES YES YES YES YES
WH780 YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES
WH791 YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES
WH795 YES YES YES YES YES YES YES
WH797 YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES
WH802  

style=”width:744px”

WJ822 YES YES YES YES YES YES YES
2 5 7 7 7 7 7 7 5 4

Specifications:

Item B.2 B(I.)6 PR.7
Length 65 feet 6 inches 66 feet 8 inches
Wingspan 64 feet 64 feet 64 feet
Height 15 feet 8 inches 15 feet 8 inches 15 feet 8 inches
Weight – empty 21,650 pounds
Weight – maximum 55,000 pounds 43,200 pounds
Fuel capacity 1,374 gallons in three fuselage tanks and 500 gallons in the wing-tip tanks. Total 1,874 1,400 gallons in three fuselage tanks, 900 gallons in wing tanks and 488 gallons in wing-tip tanks. Total 2,788 1,917 gallons in six fuselage tanks, 900 gallons in wing tanks and 488 gallons in wing-tip tanks. Total 3,305.
Engines Two Rolls-Royce Mk.101 turbojets, each producing 6,500 pounds of thrust Two Rolls-Royce Mk.109 turbojets, each producing 7,400 pounds of thrust Two Rolls-Royce Mk.109 turbojets, each producing 7,400 pounds of thrust
Max. speed – sea level 525 mph
Max. speed – 40,000 feet 580 mph (0.85M)
Cruise 450 mph
Ferry range 3,380 miles
Service ceiling 48,000 feet
Rate of climb 3,400 feet per minute

A total of fifty-eight Canberra served with 45 and or 81 Sqn., and nine were destroyed or damaged beyond repair as a result of flying accidents. The most complete airframe still in existence is PR.7 WH791.

Individual airframe details:

WD948 B.2

Issued to FEAF 12 March 1958, and it joined 45 Sqn. on 8 April 1958. To MB (Repair) 21 August 1959, returning to 45 Sqn. on 29 September 1959. Issued to the UK 23 October 1959 and sent to EECo. for modifications on 3 November 1959, these being completed by 9 February 1960, and re-issued to 45 Sqn. 23 February 1960. Transferred to 75 Sqn. (RNZAF) on 29 January 1962. Later returned to the UK.

FATE – SOC on 1 May 1977 as Cat.5(GI) becoming 8530M and used for fire fighting training at Manston and subsequently burnt.

WD963 T.4

Allocated to 81 Sqn. 9 February 1963. Assessed as Cat.3 on 6 May 1964. Then back to 81 Sqn. To 389 MU (Seletar) 30 June 1965, and then joined 45 Sqn. 24 June 1966. Assessed as Cat.3 on 31 August 1966, rejoining 45 Sqn. the next day. On 13 September 1966 once again assessed as Cat.3, returning to 45 Sqn. 3 October 1966.

FATE – On 29 June 1967 it was classified as Cat.5(S), after both engines flamed out and it was then abandoned over sea 2 miles South of Tengah. Its crew, Flying Officers Hudson and Hill, survived. SOC on 10 July 1967 as Cat.5(C), so some parts were recovered.

WH646 B.2

Issued to 45 Sqn. 16 December 1957, it joined 45 Sqn. on 17 January 1958, before being issued to FEAF 23 January 1958. Assessed as Cat.3 on 5 October 1959, being allocated to Seletar for repair 8 October 1959, returning to 45 Sqn. on 20 October 1959. After a flight it was assessed as Cat.3 on 23 December 1959, being allocated to Seletar on 31 December 1959. It was re-issued to 45 Sqn. on 31 March 1960. To the UK 26 April 1960, being allocated to EECo. for modifications 3 May 1960, these being completed 12 September 1960. Allocated to Seletar on 27 October 1960 and put into store. Issued to 75 Sqn. (RNZAF) 25 April 1961, being transferred to 45 Sqn. 11 August 1961, returning to 75 Sqn. (RNZAF) 8 January 1962. Later returned to the UK.

FATE – scrapped in the 1990s, with its cockpit section being preserved at Midland Air Museum, Baginton, Coventry.

WH651 T.4

Issued to FEAF 19 December 1957, and then loaned to Far East Comms Sqn. (FECS) 29 January 1958. Assessed as Cat.3 after flight on 31 March 1958 and allocated to MB (Repair) 18 April 1958 for repairs. Rejoined FECS 1 June 1959. Issued to 81 Sqn. on 6 January 1960. To the UK on 8 January 1963, being allocated to EECo. for modifications 29 January 1963, these being completed by 16 September 1963. Issued to 45 Sqn. 29 October 1963. Transferred to 81 Sqn. 1 December 1969. Believed to have remained in silver and dayglo finish throughout its service with FEAF.

UK – to St. Athan, Wales, 16 January 1970.

FATE – declared a NEA on 19 March 1971, SOC on 14 February 1972 as Cat.5(S).

WH665 B.2

Allocated to FEAF 23 December 1957, having joined 45 Sqn. 20 December 1957. Issued to FEAF 23 January 1958, it was received by 45 Sqn. at Tengah 17 January 1958. Assessed as Cat.3 on 5 October 1959, it was allocated to Seletar (Repairs) on 8 October 1959 and it rejoined 45 Sqn. 22 October 1959. To the UK on 26 March 1960, sent to EECo. for modifications 1 April 1960 and this work was completed 5 July 1960. It was re-issued to 45 Sqn. 4 August 1960. Assessed as requiring further repairs on 13 December 1960, it was allocated to Seletar on 22 December 1960 for Cat.3 work. Back to 45 Sqn. 7 February 1961. Assessed as Cat.3 20 November 1961, it was allocated to 390 MU (Seletar) on 23 November 1961 and it rejoined 45 Sqn. 13 December 1961. Transferred to 75 Sqn. (RNZAF) on 30 December 1961. Later returned to the UK.

FATE – To National Diving Centre, Tidenham, scrapped 2008.

WH666 B.2

Issued to FEAF 21 July 1958 and ferried via Benson, to MB (Seletar) on 19 August 1958 and allocated to 45 Sqn. the same day. Transferred to 75 (RNZAF) Sqn. 10 October 1958. Back to 45 Sqn. 23 March 1959 but it rejoined 75 (RNZAF) Sqn. on 22 April 1959. Assessed as Cat.3 on 5 October 1959, it was allocated to Seletar for repairs on 8 October and it rejoined 75 (RNZAF) Sqn. 26 October 1959.

UK – Returned to the UK on 25 February 1960.

FATE – sold to AF of Zimbabwe 20 March 1981 as 2215.

WH667 B.2

Issued to FEAF 27 February 1958. Assessed as Cat.3 on 8 August 1958 and allocated to Maint Base (Repair) 28 August 1958, it going into store at Seletar on 26 February 1959. Issued to 45 Sqn. 14 May 1959. To the UK 13 January 1960, it was flown to EECo. on 18 January 1960 for modifications, this work being completed 16 March 1960. Re-issued to 45 Sqn. 25 March 1960. Assessed as Cat.3 on 2 August 1960 and allocated to Seletar (Repair) 12 August 1960. It rejoined 45 Sqn. on 18 February 1961. To 390 MU on 31 January 1962 having been assessed as Cat.3, returning to 45 Sqn. 20 February 1962. Assessed as Cat.3 once more on 16 March 1962, it went to 390 MU 20 March 1962 and was back with 45 Sqn. 4 May 1962.

UK – issued To the UK 10 December 1962.

FATE – One engine blew up on take-off from Akrotiri, Cyprus, 7 November 1980, aircraft rolled, hit ground and was destroyed by fire. Both crew members were killed. Assessed as Cat.5(S) on 27 November 1980, it was SOC in September 1982 as Cat.5(S).

WH706 T.4

Issued to FEAF 15 October 1957, it was allocated to FEAF Comms Sqn. 29 October 1957 but soon transferred to 45 Sqn. 26 November 1957. Assessed as Cat.3 on 23 September 1959 and allocated to Seletar (Repair) 1 October 1959, rejoinging 45 Sqn. 15 October 1959. Assessed as Cat.3 on 29 December 1959 Cat.3 (Prov), it was allocated to Seletar (Repair) the same day and it was returned to 45 Sqn. 26 January 1960. To 389 MU on 15 November 1961 for further maintenance, it was issued to Tengah 8 January 1962 before being issued to the UK 19 January 1962, going to EECo. for modifications that month. The work was completed by 21 May 1962 and it was re-issued to 45 Sqn. 20 June 1962. Assessed as Cat.3 on 11 July 1963, it rejoined 45 Sqn. 4 September 1963. To 389 MU (Seletar) on 7 December 1963 for more maintenance. Issued to 81 Sqn. 10 July 1964. Assessed as Cat.3(Flyable) on 20 February 1965, it was then upgraded to Cat.3 on 24 September 1965, the work was completed by 17 October 1965 when it was returned to 81 Sqn. Assessed as Cat.3 on 31 July 1967, it rejoined 81 Sqn. on 15 September 1967. Transferred to 45 Sqn. on 1 December 1969.

UK – to St. Athan, Wales, 19 February 1970.

FATE – declared a NEA on 19 March 1971 and was SOC on 7 July 1972 as Cat.5(S) and scrapped.

WH739 B.2

Issued to 45 Sqn. 20 January 1962.

UK – to 15 MU (Wroughton) 24 August 1962.

FATE – to St. Athan, Wales, 8 September 1975 and SOC on 27 July 1976 as Cat.5 (S). Its cockpit section was given to 2475 Sqn. ATC, Ammanford, Wales.

WH777 PR.7

Issued to FEAF 5 February 1960, and it joined 81 Sqn. on 12 February 1960. Assessed as Cat.3 on 15 December 1960 after a flight, it was allocated to Seletar on 1 February 1961 for repair and it was returned to 81 Sqn. on 17 April 1961. On 3 May 1962 assessed as Cat.3 and allocated to 390 MU on 7 May 1962, not being returned to 81 Sqn. until 1 December 1962. Assessed as Cat.3 on 22 June 1963, it rejoined 81 Sqn. on 1 August 1963. On 20 February 1965 declared to be Cat.3(Flyable). Returned to 81 Sqn. 19 February 1966. Assessed as Cat.3 on 5 July 1966 and back with 81 Sqn. 19 July 1966. Assessed as Cat.3 on 10 December 1966 and returned to 81 Sqn. 23 December 1966. On 2 August 1969 asessed as Cat.3 after a flight, it rejoined 81 Sqn. on 26 September 1969. Assessed as Cat.3 on 17 December 1969 and was back with 81 Sqn. on 13 January 1970.

UK – to St. Athan, Wales 16 January 1970 and put into long-term store.

FATE – sold to British Aerospace (Warton, Lancs.) on 30 November 1981. Stripped for spares including rear fuselage and tail which went to Samlesbury in January 1982. Briefly dumped at St. Athan, Wales, prior to removal to the Wales Air Museum at Rhoose, being scrapped there 1997-98.

WH778 PR.7

Issued to FEAF on 6 July 1962, it joined 81 Sqn. 13 July 1962. Assessed as Cat.3 on 8 November 1962 after a flight and it was returned to 81 Sqn. 1 January 1963. Assessed as Cat.3 on 20 February 1965 and it was back with 81 Sqn. on 3 August 1965. Assessed as Cat.3 on 7 September 1966 and it rejoined 81 Sqn. on 15 November 1966.

FATE – its nosewheel collapsed on landing and it swung off the runway, at Tengah 20 December 1968, being assessed as Cat.3 initially, it was SOC on 27 March 1969 as Cat.5(C).

WH780 PR.7

Canberra-PR7-WH780

Issued to FEAF on 18 July 1960, it joined 81 Sqn. 4 August 1960. Assessed as Cat.3 on 11 December 1962 after a flight and was allocated to 389 MU (Seletar) on 1 February 1963 for repairs. It rejoined 81 Sqn. 24 April 1963. Assessed as Cat.3 on 5 November 1963, returning to 81 Sqn. 14 November 1963. To 389/390 MU (Seletar) on 19 May 1964 after being assessed as Cat.3. It was back with 81 Sqn. on 31 July 1964. Assessed as Cat.3 on 1 December 1966, it was returned to 81 Sqn. on 9 December 1966. Assessed as Cat.3 on 25 November 1968, it rejoined 81 Sqn. on 21 January 1969. It was in overall natural metal during 1968.

UK – to St. Athan, Wales, 16 January 1970.

FATE – sold as scrap in May 1991 to Hanningfield Metals, Essex.

WH791 PR.7

Issued to FEAF 26 June 1961 and it was with 81 Sqn. 27 June 1961. Assessed as Cat.3 on 20 February 1965. Repair work is undated. Declared Cat.3 again on 6 April 1966, being returned to 81 Sqn. 6 May 1966. Assessed as Cat.3 once more on 27 September 1968 and was back with 81 Sqn. 19 November 1968. On 26 June 1969 it was assessed as Cat.3, the work being completed by 9 September 1969 when it was rejoined 81 Sqn.

UK – to St. Athan, Wales 18 January 1970.

FATE – declared a NEA on 24 September 1971, it was SOC 11 February 1972 and it became the gate guardian at Cottesmore, 1972-1998. Later sold to the Newark Air Museum, and moved there on 29 November 1998. It is still there on display. In 2013 it was painted as WH792, in 31 Sqn. markings.

WH795 PR.7

Declared Cat.3 on 18 September 1957 before it was allocated to FEAF on 9 October 1957. To MB (Repair) at Seletar 30 May 1958. Issued to the UK on 2 September 1959, being sent to EECo. for modifications 4 September 1959. The work was completed on 5 February 1960. To 15 MU (Wroughton) 10 February 1960 and onto 49 MU (Colerne) for Special Fit 12 May 1960, this being finished by 4 July 1960. Issued again to FEAF, on 21 July 1960, to 15 MU (Wroughton) 12 October 1960 after becoming unserviceable at Benson prior to its intended departure. To 5 MU (Kemble) 20 January 1961 for further work before returning to 15 MU (Wroughton) on 7 February 1961. Issued once more to FEAF 23 February 1961 and it joined 81 Sqn. on 1 March 1961. Assessed as Cat.3 on 9 December 1961, it was allocated to 390 MU (Seletar) for repairs 18 December 1961, and returned to 81 Sqn. 24 January 1962. Assessed as Cat.3 on 11 August 1965 after a flight, it rejoining 81 Sqn. 7 September 1965. On 21 September 1967 assessed as Cat.3 once more, it being back with 81 Sqn. on 13 November 1967.

FATE – after a fast landing, a tyre burst and it crash landed on the wet runway at Kai Tak, Hong Kong, 5 August 1968 and then broke up after skidding scross the grass and ending up in a sewage drain. SOC on 23 August 1968 as Cat.5(C).

WH797 PR.7

Issued to FEAF 28 March 1961 and it joined 81 Sqn. 29 March 1961. Declared Cat.3 on 2 February 1963, it was allocated for repair to 389 MU (Seletar) 18 April 1963. Not returned to 81 Sqn. until 10 June 1964. Assessed as Cat.3(Flyable) on 20 February 1965, this was upgraded to Cat.3 on 22 August 1966 and it was back on 81 Sqn.’s strength on 8 September 1966. Declared Cat.3 14 November 1968 after flight, it being returned to 81 Sqn. on 25 November 1968. Assessed as Cat.3 on 22 October 1969, it was back with 81 Sqn. 28 November 1969.

UK – to St. Athan, Wales, on 16 January 1970.

FATE – sold as scrap to Hanningfield Metals by October 1992.

WH802 PR.7

Issued to 81 Sqn. 21 February 1969.

UK – to RAF Germany (via Wyton) on 3 November 1969, SOC on 27 February 1970 as Cat.5(GI) and held by RAF Germany for decoy use at Bruggen as 8067M.

FATE – scrapped at Bruggen after June 1978.

WH847 T.4

Allocated to FEAF 14 March 1960 and departed Kemble the same day (5 MU believed it was joining 81 Sqn.). Delivered to Seletar on 19 April 1960 and placed into store. Issued 16 April 1961 to 45 Sqn. Assessed as Cat.3 on 8 June 1963, it was returned to 45 Sqn. 25 July 1963.

UK – to 15 MU (Wroughton) 19 October 1963.

FATE – Sold to Indian AF as T.4 Q495, flown from Samlesbury to 5 MU (Kemble) on 23 August 1966. Delivered to India during July 1968.

WH853 B.2

Allocated to 45 Sqn. on 27 November 1957, it was issued to FEAF 9 December 1957 and joined 45 Sqn., at Tengah, on 14 December 1957. Coded ‘D’ by November 1958.

FATE – on 18 November 1958 it stalled after take off from Tengah, after both engines cut. The pilot and one navigator died. It crashed through trees into an inlet 2,000 feet from the runway. It was SOC 28 November 1958 as Cat.5(C).

WH874 B.2

to 45 Sqn. 25 November 1957, issued to FEAF 23 January 1958, to 45 Sqn. at Tengah 17 January 1958. Allocated to the UK on 21 January 1960, being sent to EECo. 15 February 1960 for modifications, this being finished on 4 May 1960. Re-issued to 45 Sqn. 17 May 1960, it was allocated to Seletar 18 May 1960, returning to 45 Sqn. 23 July 1960.

UK – issued to the UK on 27 October 1962.

FATE – Collided with T.4 WJ862, whilst both based at Cottesmore, over Sutton-in-Ashfield 29 January 1971 and crashed at Coxmoor, Notts. SOC the same day as Cat.5(S).

WH882 B.2

to 45 Sqn. 28 November 1957, issued to FEAF 9 December 1957.

FATE – written off on 13 December 1957 as Cat.5 but it was still issued to 45 Sqn. Tengah 14 December 1957 despite having crashed on delivery. It collided with WJ983 in formation, in cloud and crashed at Kota Tinggi, Malaysia. The aircraft were ‘buzzing’ the airfield at Tengah, Singapore to celebrate their arrival when WH882 caught up with and collided with WJ983. All three crew in WH882 were killed. SOC on 14 December 1957 as Cat.5(S).

WH922 B.2

Allotted to FEAF 8 July 1959, it was issued to 45 Sqn. 21 July 1959. Transferred to 75 (RNZAF) Sqn. 25 February 1960, then allocated to Seletar for repairs on 8 August 1960, and then joined 45 Sqn. 14 October 1960.

UK – to 15 MU (Wroughton) 13 February 1961.

FATE – to Catterick for fire fighting 23 December 1970 and burnt.

WH948 B.15

Issued to 45 Sqn. on 6 June 1969. Declared as Cat.3 4 July 1969, rejoining 45 Sqn. on 27 September 1969.

UK – To St. Athan, Wales, 19 February 1970.

FATE – On 15 August 1977 it was abandoned after the starboard engine caught fire during an air test and it crashed into woodland at Holt, 7 miles North West of Coltishall, Norfolk. SOC on 24 August 1977 as Cat.5 (S).

WH955 B.15

Allotted to FEAF and departed via Lyneham 12 October 1967, joining 45 Sqn. on 26 October 1967, Assessed as Cat.3 12 September 1969, it was returned to 45 Sqn. on 13 February 1970.

UK – to St. Athan, Wales, 19 February 1970.

FATE – declared a NEA 30 January 1976 and SOC 29 October 1976 and sold for scrap.

WH956 B.15

Issued to 45 Sqn. on 8 May 1967. Declared Cat.3 (Flyable) on 5 September 1968 and it was returned to 45 Sqn. 24 February 1969.

FATE – On 15 July 1969, it was assessed as Cat.4, following a landing accident at Tengah. Reclassified as Cat.3 on 22 September 1969, however it was SOC 29 December 1969 as Cat.5(C).

WH958 B.15

Allocated to FEAF 21 December 1962, it joined 45 Sqn. on 12 January 1963. Allocated to 389 MU (Seletar) on 27 March 1963 for maintenance, returning to 45 Sqn. on 14 March 1964. Coded ‘J’ by August 1964.

FATE – on 17 August 1964 it was assessed as Cat.3 (Provisional), the pilot having abandoned the take off from Kai Tak after it ran into a flock of kite hawks. It then ran off the runway and ended up in Hong Kong Harbour. Reclassified as Cat.5(C) 26 August 1964, it was SOC 10 October 1964 as Cat.5(S).

WH959 B.15

Issued to 45 Sqn. on 20 June 1964. To BAC for modifications 13 August 1965. Then issued to the NEAF Strike Wing, Akrotiri, Cyprus, on 2 September 1966. It was transferred to 45 Sqn. on 25 July 1967. Assessed as requiring repairs on 12 September 1968 and was back with 45 Sqn. on 15 October 1968.

FATE – sold to the BAC on 16 May 1969 and was exported to the Indian Air Force as IF1022.

WH961 B.15 (AS.30 capable)

to FEAF via Lyneham 22 November 1966, to 45 Sqn. on 28 November 1966.

FATE – sold to BAC on 16 May 1969 and it became Indian AF B(I).66 IF1023.

WH963 B.15

Allocated to to FEAF on 30 November 1962, it joined 45 Sqn. 5 December 1962. Assessed as Cat.3 on 27 September 1963, rejoining 45 Sqn. 11 October 1963. Assessed Cat.3 on 30 November 1965, it being returned to 45 Sqn. on 11 December 1965. Assessed as Cat.3 on 26 January 1966, it was back with 45 Sqn. 13 May 1966. Allocated 12 September 1966 for return to the UK for inspection by Marshalls (Cambridge), it was declared Cat.3 on 29 November 1966, being repaired on site by personnel from 60 MU (Leconfield) from 5 December 1966, the work being completed 15 March 1967. It rejoined 45 Sqn. on 25 July 1967. It was allocated to 389 MU (Seletar) on 4 December 1967, being returned to 45 Sqn. 4 September 1968. Assessed as Cat.3 on 26 May 1969, and was back with 45 Sqn. 15 July 1969. Another assessment of Cat.3 repairs occurred 24 October 1969, it rejoining 45 Sqn. on 24 November 1969.

UK – to St. Athan, Wales, 19 February 1970.

Fate – declared a NEA 22 February 1972, SOC 20 September 1972 and scrapped. Its rear fuselage was sent to CSDE Swanton Morley.

WH965 B.15

Allocated to FEAF 21 December 1962, it joined 45 Sqn. on 11 January 1963. Assessed as Cat.3 on 2 September 1963 and it was returned to 45 Sqn. on 1 October 1963. Declared Cat.4 on 30 November 1965, this was downgraded to Cat.3 on 16 December 1966 and it rejoined 45 Sqn. on 16 February 1967.

UK – to 15 MU (Wroughton) 25 April 1967, being assessed as Cat.4 upon arrival.

FATE – declared a NEA 28 March 1968, and was allocated to 32 MU (St. Athan, Wales) for ground instruction as 8015M, arriving there 16 May 1968. Sold as scrap on 13 April 1970 to Bradburys, Bournemouth.

WH966 B.15

Issued to 45 Sqn. on 12 February 1969. Assessed as Cat.3 on 3 November 1969 and returned to 45 Sqn. 3 December 1969.

UK – to St. Athan, Wales, 19 February 1970.

FATE – declared a NEA on 30 January 1976 and SOC 20 September 1976. In that month its nose and tail sections were put in a hangar at St. Athan, Wales, the remainder placed on the scrap dump outside.

WH968 B.15

Issued to 45 Sqn. on 12 February 1969. Assessed as Cat.3 on 30 September 1969, returning to 45 Sqn. 16 December 1969.

UK – to St. Athan, Wales, 19 February 1970.

FATE – declared a NEA 30 January 1975, it was SOC 29 October 1976 and sold for scrap.

WH969 B.15

Issued to FEAF 28 August 1962, and joined 45 Sqn. on 3 September 1962. Assessed as Cat.3 on 5 November 1963, returning to 45 Sqn. on 29 November 1963. Assessed as Cat.3 (Flyable) on 20 February 1965, being returned to 45 Sqn. on 27 July 1965. Declared Cat.3 on 19 March 1966, rejoining 45 Sqn. on 29 April 1966.

UK – to 15 MU (Wroughton) 25 July 1967.

FATE – declared a NEA on 28 March 1968, and transported on 29 November 1968 to P&EE Shoeburyness, a weapons testing facility in Essex. Later scrapped.

WH974 B.15

Allocated to FEAF on 11 July 1967 via Lyneham, joining 45 Sqn. on 17 July 1967. Declared Cat.3 on 27 September 1967 post-flight, it was returned to 45 Sqn. 10 November 1967. Assessed as Cat.3 on 2 May 1969, rejoining 45 Sqn. on 20 May 1969.

UK – to St. Athan, Wales, on 19 February 1970.

FATE – declared a NEA 22 February 1972, it was SOC on 16 March 1973 and allocated to Wittering for fire fighting. Badly burnt by June 1977.

WH976 B.15

Issued to FEAF 20 April 1966, it joined 45 Sqn. on 26 April 1966. To 389 MU (Seletar) on 28 June 1966 for maintenance, it was returned to 45 Sqn. 3 October 1966.

UK – to 15 MU (Wroughton) on 4 April 1967.

FATE – declared a NEA on 12 October 1970, it was SOC 29 November 1971 and sent to Catterick for fire fighting. Burnt to destruction during 1973.

WH977 B.15 (AS.30 capable)

Issued to 45 Sqn. on 13 June 1966. Assessed as Cat.3 on 20 November 1967, returning to 45 Sqn. on 23 December 1967. Declared Cat.3 4 November 1968, it rejoining 45 Sqn. on 4 December 1968. Assessed as Cat.3 2 April 1969, being back with 45 Sqn. on 27 June 1969.

UK – to St. Athan, Wales, 23 December 1969.

FATE – declared a NEA 22 February 1972, “Converted to scrap” on 5 July 1973 but “written off in error” and was allotted back to St. Athan, on 1 August 1973. Issued to Catterick on 1 January 1974 for fire fighting training and burnt to destruction.

WH981 B.15

Issued to 45 Sqn. on 6 June 1969. Assessed as Cat.3 on 28 November 1969 and returned to 45 Sqn. 13 January 1970.

UK – to St. Athan, Wales, 19 March 1970.

FATE – Scrapped during 1995 at Hanningfield Metals, Stock, Essex.

WJ567 B.2

Issued to 45 Sqn. on 30 December 1957, and allocated to FEAF 23 January 1958. With 45 Sqn. at Tengah on 17 January 1958. Allocated to the UK on 4 July 1959, being sent to EECo. for modifications 10 July 1959. This was completed 31 December 1959 and it was re-issued to 45 Sqn. on 11 January 1960. Assessed as Cat.3 on 14 December 1960, rejoining 45 Sqn. on 2 February 1961. Assessed as Cat.3 (Prov.) on 26 July 1961, it was allocated to 390 MU (Seletar) on 14 August 1961 for repair, it being returned to 45 Sqn. on 16 October 1961. Transferred to 75 (RNZAF) Sqn. on 26 February 1962. Back with 45 Sqn. on 16 March 1962.

UK – issued To the UK 17 April 1962, to 15 MU (Wroughton) 25 April 1962.

FATE – Scrapped at Wyton December 1991. Its cockpit is preserved at Houghton, Cambs.

WJ570 B.2

Issued to 45 Sqn. at Coningsby on 22 November 1957, and then with 45 Sqn. at Tengah on 14 December 1957. Assessed as Cat.3 on 21 February 1958, then allocated to MB (Repair) on 6 March 1958, then to MB (Storage) on 22 May 1958. Issued to 45 Sqn. on 28 August 1958, but back with MB (Repair) on 2 September 1958. It rejoined 45 Sqn. on 20 September 1958. Assessed as Cat.3 (Prov.) on 21 February 1959, to MB (Repair) 27 February 1959 and it was returned to 45 Sqn. on 23 June 1959. Allocated to the UK on 25 September 1959, being sent to EECo. on 4 October 1959 for modifications, thses being completed by 22 February 1960. Re-issued to 45 Sqn. on 22 March 1960, then transferred to 75 Sqn., RNZAF, on 3 January 1962. Later returned to the UK.

FATE – Sold to Venezuelan AF 30 April 1966 as B.2 1183 and was still operational in 1977.

WJ605 B.2

Issued to 45 Sqn. 26 February 1962.

FATE – On 16 April 1962 it broke up during a bombing run over China Rock Range, 26 miles East of Changi when the port engine exploded. Its crew was killed. SOC on 30 May 1962 as Cat.5(M).

WJ630 B.15

Issued to 45 Sqn. 10 January 1962.

UK – to 15 MU (Wroughton) 20 September 1962.

FATE – scrapped at Wyton in 1995.

WJ632 B.15

Allocated to FEAF 2 April 1958, it was issued to 45 Sqn. on 21 April 1958. Allocated to the UK on 13 August 1959, being sent to EECo. on 17 August 1959 for modifications. These were completed on 11 January 1960 and it was re-issued to 45 Sqn. 29 January 1960.

UK – to 15 MU (Wroughton) 20 September 1962.

FATE – On 1 May 1970, the pilot lost control of the aircraft at 4,000ft during an asymmetric assessment exercise and the aircraft spun into Lyme Bay, 3½ miles South East of Bridport, Dorset. The wreck was sold to the Ministry of Technology 10 June 1970.

WJ648 B.2

Allocated to FEAF on 16 October 1959, and issued to 45 Sqn. 5 November 1959. On 27 January 1960 declared Cat.3 post-flight. Allocated to Seletar (Repair) on 6 February 1960, it returning to 45 Sqn. on 12 February 1960. Issued to the UK on 9 August 1960.

UK – to 15 MU (Wroughton) 29 September 1960,

FATE – declared a NEA on 7 April 1965, it was sold as scrap 20 December 1966 to R.J. Coley, Hounslow.

WJ727 B.2

Issued to 45 Sqn. (FEAF) on 10 August 1959. Assessed as Cat.3 (Prov.) on 24 September 1959, then allocated to Seletar (Repair) 1 October 1959 and returned to 45 Sqn. on 5 October 1959.

UK – to 15 MU (Wroughton) 21 October 1960 and transferred to NEA stock on 21 November 1961.

FATE – sold as scrap 14 February 1964 to R.J. Coley of Hounslow.

WJ766 B.15 (Not AS.30 capable)

B15-Tengah

Allocated to FEAF on 29 August 1962 and issued to 45 Sqn. 2 October 1962. Assessed as Cat.3 on 2 August 1963 and was returned to 45 Sqn. on 10 September 1963. Assessed as Cat.3 on 7 March 1964, it rejoining 45 Sqn. on 22 May 1964. Allocated to 389/390 MU (Seletar) on 3 July 1964 as Cat.3, being back with 45 Sqn. on 22 July 1964. Assessed as Cat.3 on 20 February 1965 and it was returned to 45 Sqn. on 14 April 1965. Later returned to the UK, during 1968-69.

FATE – sold to BAC on 14 April 1969 and placed in storage. Scrapped 1976.

WJ822 PR.7

Allocated to FEAF 19 November 1961 and issued to 81 Sqn. on 15 November 1961. Allocated to 389/390 MU (Seletar) 11 June 1964. Declared Cat.3 on 20 February 1965 and was returned to 81 Sqn. 29 April 1965. Assessed as Cat.3 on 11 August 1965 and it rejoined 81 Sqn. on 11 September 1965. Declared Cat.3 on 30 November 1965, going back to 81 Sqn. on 13 January 1966. Declared Cat.3 on 10 May 1966, not being returned to 81 Sqn. until 22 February 1967. Allocated to BAC on 15 March 1967 for inspection, then to 5 MU (Kemble) on 17 January 1968 and it departed to FEAF 19 January 1968, rejoining 81 Sqn. on 29 January 1968.

FATE – On take-off at Tengah on 29 May 1969, the starboard engine flamed out. The pilot abandoned the take-off. The engine then relit, the aircraft left the runway and the undercarriage collapsed. SOC on 3 July 1969 as Cat.5(C).

WJ981 B.2

Allocated to FEAF 30 June 1958, it was received at MB (Storage) on 10 July 1958. Issued to 45 Sqn. 10 October 1958. Declared Cat.3 on 4 March 1959 post-flight. Allocated to MB (Repair) on 9 March 1959 and returned to 45 Sqn. on 2 January 1960. Allocated to the UK on 7 March 1960, going to EECo. for modifications 14 March 1960, which were completed by 9 June 1960. It was re-issued to 45 Sqn. on 3 June 1960. Assessed as Cat.3 on 10 March 1962, it was allocated to 389 MU on 7 May 1962, and returned to 45 Sqn. on 28 September 1962.

UK – to 15 MU (Wroughton) 19 October 1962.

FATE – scrapped at Wyton 27 August 1995.

WJ983 B.2

Issued to 45 Sqn. 20 November 1957, allocated to FEAF 9 December 1957.

FATE – on 13 December 1957 it collided with WH882 in formation in cloud and crashed at Pontain, Johore, Malaysia. The aircraft were ‘buzzing’ the airfield at Tengah to celebrate their arrival when WH882 caught up with and collided with WJ983. One crew member was killed. Issued to 45 Sqn. the following day (disregarding the aircraft’s destruction), it was then SOC on 14 December 1957 as Cat.5(S)).

WJ986 B.2

to 45 Sqn. 5 December 1961.

UK – issued to the UK 10 December 1962, received by 33 MU (Lyneham) 18 December 1962.

FATE – scrapped at Wyton January 1995.

WJ988 B.2

Issued to 45 Sqn. on 5 January 1962. Assessed as Cat.3 on 10 July 1962 and back with 45 Sqn. 19 July 1962.

UK – issued to the UK 12 November 1962, it was received by 15 MU (Wroughton) 29 November 1962 for storage.

FATE – on 20 November 1968 it suffered a bird strike on take-off from Watton, its undercarriage being raised to bring the aircraft to a stop. Assessed as Cat.3 initially, it was re-classified as Cat.5(C), SOC on 7 March 1969 and allocated to 71 MU (Bicester) as scrap.

WK102 B.2

Issued to 45 Sqn. 15 May 1962.

UK – to 15 MU (Wroughton) 20 August 1962.

FATE – SOC on 18 February 1983 and issued to 2 SoTT, Cosford as Cat.5(GI) as 8780M. Sold in 1991. Its cockpit section is preserved at Welshpool, Powys, Wales.

WK111 B.2

Issued to 45 Sqn. 29 June 1961.

UK – to 15 MU (Wroughton) 25 May 1962.

Scrapped at Wyton during October 1994. Its cockpit section is preserved at Witherton.

WT206 B.15

Allocated to FEAF 18 January 1965 and issued to 45 Sqn. on 10 February 1965.

UK – to 15 MU (Wroughton) 10 August 1965.

FATE – declared a NEA on 8 August 1967 and SOC on 1 October 1971 as Cat.5(S), at Wroughton.

WT208 B.15

Issued to 45 Sqn. 19 November 1962. Assessed as Cat.3 on 29 October 1963 and returned to 45 Sqn. on 5 November 1963. Assessed as Cat.3 on 30 November 1965 and rejoined 45 Sqn. on 8 January 1966. Declared Cat.3 on 21 April 1966 and back with 45 Sqn. on 9 May 1966.

UK – to Marshalls (Cambridge) for inspection 14 December 1966, to 15 MU (Wroughton) on 9 March 1967 and sold to BAC on 14 November 1967, becoming Peruvian AF 239.

FATE: It crashed on 12 November 1973.

WT209 B.15

Allocated to FEAF 1 October 1962 and issued to 45 Sqn. on 8 October 1962. Declared Cat.3 on 20 February 1965, it was back with 45 Sqn. 26 March 1965. Assessed as Cat.3 on 11 August 1965, it was returned to 45 Sqn. on 11 October 1965. Assessed as Cat.3 on 8 February 1966, post-flight, and back with 45 Sqn. on 15 March 1966. Assessed as Cat.3 on 10 November 1966, it was returned to 45 Sqn. on 15 November 1966. Declared Cat.3 on 6 June 1967, it rejoined 45 Sqn. on 2 August 1967.

FATE – on 1 February 1968 it suffered a hydraulics failure, leading to the undercarriage not lowering and a belly landing at Tengah ensued. Assessed as Cat.3 initially, it was reclassified as Cat.5(C) on 14 February 1968 and SOC 19 March 1968.

WT211 B.15

Allocated to FEAF 8 October 1962 and issued to 45 Sqn. 10 October 1962. On 19 November 1962 it was assessed as Cat.3 post flight, and was returned to 45 Sqn. on 15 December 1962. Assessed as Cat.3 on 21 February 1963, rejoining 45 Sqn. 5 April 1963. Declared Cat.3 on 10 December 1963, going back to 45 Sqn. on 9 January 1964. Assessed as Cat.3 on 24 April 1964, it returned to 45 Sqn. on 8 September 1964. Once again assessed at Cat.3, on 20 February 1965, it rejoined 45 Sqn. on 5 June 1965. Declared Cat.3 on 30 November 1965, it was back with 45 Sqn. on 15 January 1966. On 20 September 1967 it was assessed as Cat.3. However this time it did not return to 45 Sqn.

UK – to 15 MU (Wroughton) 14 February 1968. SOC 1 March 1972 as Cat.5(C) and sold for scrap at Cottesmore in 1972.

WT213 B.15 (AS.30 capable)

Allocated to 45 Sqn. on 30 November 1966 and it departed 5 MU (Kemble) via Lyneham 7 December 1966. The date it joined 45 Sqn. is unknown. Assessed as Cat.3 on 18 April 1968, it being deemed to be Cat.3 (Flyable) until 8 July 1968, it rejoined 45 Sqn. 23 August 1968. Coded ‘H’ by 1969.

FATE – it suffered a landing accident at Tengah, on 17 March 1969, and was SOC as Cat. 5(C) on 22 April 1969.

WT370 B.16

Allocated to FEAF on 29 May 1964, for 45 Sqn.

FATE – on 23 September 1964 the starboard engine lost power during a roller landing at Kauntan, Malaysia and was abandoned, the crew comprising Flying Officer P.H. Sykes (pilot) and Flying Officer C.G. Jefford (navigator) suffered minor injuries. The aircraft crashed into a rubber plantation one mile south of Kauntan. SOC on 10 October 1964 as Cat.5(C).

XK641 B.15

Allocated to FEAF on 23 October 1962 and issued to 45 Sqn. 6 November 1962. To 389 MU (Seletar) on 2 December 1963 having been assessed as Cat.3 and it was returned to 45 Sqn. 10 December 1963. Assessed as Cat.3 on 4 July 1964, it rejoined 45 Sqn. on 24 November 1964. Assigned the code ‘E’ by 1966.

FATE – on 4 April 1966 it rolled and dived into the ground after loss of control during a flypast at Taseh Chini jungle camp, Penang State, Malaysia. All three crew were killed. The accident was observed by several personnel from 45 Sqn. on an adventure training exercise. SOC 15 June 1966.

Abbreviations:

BAC – British Aircraft Corporation – a major UK aircraft producer formed in the nineteen sixties.

Cat.3 – the third level of damage classification for RAF aircraft. This one meant the repairs required were beyond the capabilities/resources of the operating unit and therefore had to be carried by a maintenance unit or the manufacturer.

Cat.3 (Flyable) – meant the damage did not require immediate permanent repairs, these either being deferred or a temporary repair made to delay the need for permanent repairs.

Cat.4 – this indicated that special facilities or equipment were required to make the major repairs.

Cat.5 – the airframe was deemed to be either beyond economic repair or surplus to requirements.

Cat.5(C) – (C) meant components, which indicated that the airframe had useable components that were to be removed for future use elsewhere.

Cat.5(GI) – (GI) refers to Ground Instruction, whereby the airframe was to be used for ground training purposes.

Cat.5(M) – (M) means Missing, therefore the airframe was not found after a flight.

Cat.5(S) – the airframe (or what remained) is fit only for sale as scrap.

EECo. – English Electric Co. – the company that designed the Canberra

MB (Repairs) – Maintenance Base (Repairs) – this referred to the engineering and logistics presence at Seletar, later reorganised as 389 MU and 390 MU in the sixties.

MB (Storage) – Maintenance Base (Storage) – see MB (Repairs).

NEA – Non-Effective Airframe – airframe no longer required to be flown from that date.

Seletar (Repair) – see MB (Repair)

SOC – Struck Off Charge – airframe no longer on military records from that date.

Credits:

Air Historical Branch.

Wolverhampton Aviation Group.

UK Serials.

www.ejection-history.org.uk.

English Electric Canberra, Roland Beamont and Arthur Reed (Ian Allan)

RAF Canberra Units of the Cold War, Andrew Brookes (Osprey)

Drop Zone Borneo, Roger Annett (Pen and Sword)

More Photos